Standout Cannabis Studies from 2016

As the tide has begun to shift in favor of the legalization of cannabis, both in United States and abroad, one of the positive side effects is that we’ve seen more marijuana-related studies being funded. Now more than ever, we're beginning to see the results from well-executed trials and experiments that can help to dispel some of the more widely-held beliefs about cannabis. 

CANNABIS DOESN'T CAUSE AGGRESSION

This study, which looked for a correlation between cannabis use and subsequent aggression (as compared to alcohol) was conducted by a group in the Netherlands and published in the journal Psychopharmacology. Using a random controlled trial, they ultimately found that "alcohol facilitates feelings of aggression, whereas cannabis diminishes aggressive feelings in heavy alcohol and regular cannabis users, respectively." 

CANNABIS HAS NO NEGATIVE IMPACT ON MOST HEALTH FACTORS

Another study based out of New Zealand that was conducted over the course of 20 years, found that cannabis had "no negative impact on a dozen other health factors including lung function, systemic inflammation, BMI, or metabolic health," and in fact the only negative effect found was on periodontal health. 

MEDICAL MARIJUANA LEGALIZATION LEADS TO A DECLINE IN SICK DAYS USED BY EMPLOYEES

A group using the Current Population Survey found that absences due to illness saw a decline following the legalization of medical marijuana. This pattern was especially noticeable in states with looser restrictions on medical cannabis, for full-time workers, and for middle-aged males (the subset most likely to have medical marijuana cards). 

CANNABIS IS NOT A "GATEWAY DRUG" BUT RATHER AN "EXIT STRATEGY"

Researchers at the University of British Columbia found that individuals with alcohol and opioid addictions were able to use marijuana as a "realistic exit strategy" from their dependence on more harmful substances. 

 

 

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